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A book published this year:

City of the Lost by Kelley Armstrong

City of the Lost
I want to start off by saying if you have any interest at all in Supernatural fiction, you should really read Kelley Armstrong’s Women of the Otherworld series. There are 13 books in total and each one is written from the perspective of a different lead female supernatural character including werewolves, witches, ghosts, necromancers and more. This series was my introduction to this author and I loved them all. 

City of the Lost is the first book in a new crime fiction series by the author. It follows homicide detective, Casey Duncan, to live in a secret, off the grid, town where everyone has a secret. My absolute favourite thing about Armstrong’s writing is how she develops her characters. This novel was no exception and by the time you get to the end, you’ll feel like you know Casey Duncan. It’s a solid story-line with a great ‘who done it’ theme. 

As always, Armstrong delivers in giving you just enough information to keep you interested and wanting more. I still prefer her supernatural novels but would definitely recommend this read and will be looking out for the next instalment in the series.

Rating: 7/10

P.s. I know the topic is ‘published this year’ and it was technically published in 2016 but I actually read it in 2016 & never got around to reviewing it. 


Reading… 100 Pep Talks by Elise Blaha Cripe. I love everything she does and turning last year’s 100 Day Project into a book was a great idea. I’m falling asleep very quickly at night so I’m not getting through any books in a hurry.

Watching… Still hooked on Grey’s Anatomy. I’m on season 7 now, addicted and pretty sure I could perform emergency surgery if needed. I’m also catching up on the latest season of Homeland. I love it but it’s 1 of those shows I have to binge watch so I record the whole season & watch it over a couple of days. Just 2 episodes to go…

Listening to… Ed Sheeran’s new album, on repeat. Pretty sure I can sing it word for word at this stage.

Drinking… too much alcohol. It’s something about brighter weekends then make cider a great idea.

Making… lists using my new rainbow list sticky notes from ‘Get To Work Book’.

Enjoying… having 2 weeks off for Easter. I’m getting a big wardrobe clear-out done and it feels good!!

Taking… part in Elle Luna’s 100 Day Project. I have been doing something for my blog everyday for the past 11 days. So far so good.

Looking forward to… a long weekend in Wexford for the May bank holiday.

Pinning…lots of my old blog posts. I’m trying to share them on different platforms.

Considering…where we might go for a summer holiday. Any suggestions?

 

 

 

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A book by an author you’ve never read before:

Not That Kind of Girl by Lena Dunham

 

Not That Kind of Girl

I want to start by saying I absolutely love the TV show Girls. I don’t think there’s anything else on TV like it. I heard once that the second episode of a TV show tends to do worse than any other episode and that stuck with me while I watched Season 1, Episode 2 of Girl’s because 6 seasons later, it is still my favourite episode and I’ve watched it multiple times. It’s important for me to say that because I’m not going to be very pleasant about Lena Duham’s book. 

You’ll notice first of all, that normally my book review posts include a picture of me holding the book in question, but this one doesn’t. I won’t lie it felt like it took a lifetime to get through this book because I really really didn’t enjoy it. I finished it on a flight to San Francisco and I won’t lie, the thing that annoyed me most is that I couldn’t throw it against a wall when I eventually finished it because that might have startled a few other passengers. I dumped it back on my book shelf when I got home and haven’t looked at it since. So it wasn’t until I started writing this post that I realised I never took a picture of it and I don’t want to either.

I have read some short essays and interviews with Lena Dunham that I thought were brilliant and I couldn’t wait to get more so I was delighted to dive into this memoir. There were definitely some pearls of wisdom, but over all, the only thing it did for me was confirm that Lena Dunham and Hannah Horvath appear to be very similar, which isn’t a compliment considering Hannah is the singe most narcissistic character I have ever come across. One thing I will say in her favour is that it’s really refreshing to see such candor coming from a woman in a world where plenty of women are still taught to put up and shut up.

Rating: 2/10

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A book that was made into a movie:

Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín

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The third book I read as part of The Big Book Challenge was Brooklyn by Colm Tóibín. I thought this would be a good one to read as ‘a book that was made into movie’ because I had just recently been to see it in the cinema. I really loved the movie so I’d hoped I’d enjoy the book as much.

Brooklyn is a romantic drama about a young Irish immigrant moving from a small town in Ireland to Brooklyn, New York. The story follows Eilis as she falls in love, but don’t be fooled into thinking it’s just a romantic novel, it’s much much more than that. 

For many reasons, this book didn’t disappoint. The first thing I loved was that it included my two favourite places in the world, my lovely country Ireland and New York. The second thing I loved was that although it was based in the 1950’s, there was still so much to recognise about Irish culture today. Apparently busy bodies are timeless.

My favourite characters in the book were Eilis, the main character (which is unusual for me because I normally don’t like main characters), Tony, the Italian-American who captures Eilis’ heart and Mrs. Keogh. Although I think I loved this character even more because of the brilliant portrayal of her in the movie by Julie Walters.

The only thing that let the book down for me was a piece of dialogue that really stuck with me from the movie. In it, Eilis has a conversation with Father Flood that goes like this:

Father Flood: We need Irish girls in Brooklyn.
Eilis Lacey: I wish that I could stop feeling that I want to be an Irish girl in Ireland.

I loved Eilis’ line and I looked for it in the book. I suppose if that’s the only fault I can find, it’s not bad going. 

I would absolutely recommend this book to anyone who is from Ireland, wants to read about Irish culture in the 1950s and the reality of immigration, likes romantic drama novels or indeed just enjoys good writing.

Rating: 9.5/10.

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A book “everyone” but you has read:

Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

Eat, Pray, Love

Eat, Pray, Love is a memoir written by an American women on a year long journey to Italy, India and Indonesia in an effort to find what is missing from her life. It seems to me that everyone has read Eat, Pray, Love or has at least seen the movie so it seemed like an obvious choice for me for this topic.

I don’t think I have ever enjoyed a book and been frustrated by it at the same time, the way I was with Eat, Pray, Love. The memoir is broken down into 3 sections – Italy, India and Indonesia. Each section has 36 stories, most of which are really well written. I loved everything about her time living in Rome. It transported me to a time and a place and I lapped up her stories of learning Italian, meeting Italian people and most of all, eating delicious Italian food. For a real home-bird, there was a moment or two were I really imagined myself packing my bags and heading for Rome. My favourite character from Elizabeth’s time in Rome was Luca Spaghetti.

India was where my frustrations kicked in. I’ve taken a real interest in meditation lately and I was looking forward to learning all about the author’s spiritual journey. I found this section of the book extremely difficult to read and I think Elizabeth came across really narcissistic. There was a LOT of wallowing and feeling sorry for herself and if I’m honest the term ‘first world problems’ came to mind a couple of times. What salvaged this section of the book for me was Richard from Texas, who was a ‘say it as you find it’ character who often brought Elizabeth back down to earth.

The final part of the book took part in Bali, Indonesia. I learned a lot about Balinese people and how quirky the traditions of the island are. The purpose of Elizabeth’s trip to Bali was to find balance and it seems to me like the perfect place to do it. I hadn’t really considered it before but it is definitely on my list of places to go now. My favourite character from Indonesia, and probably entire book, was the medicine man Ketut. I loved his take on things, his unusual method of measuring age and his broken English. 

Overall, the writing was very good and the author has a great method of capturing the essence of a character. I would give this book a 7 out of 10 and would recommend it. I would just suggest you take the India stage with a pinch of salt.

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A book by an author you love:

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

Career of Evil

My first completed book on The Big Book Challenge is Career of Evil, the third in the Cormoran Strike series, by J.K. Rowling under the pseudonym Robert Galbraith. I’m a huge Harry Potter fan so therefore I’m a huge J.K. Rowling fan. I know what you’re thinking “Wow, that was quick. She only announced this challenge two days ago!” Well, we’ve been working on the list and choosing books for a couple of weeks now, so no, I’m not that good.

Career of Evil is a crime novel based in London. Cormoran Strike runs a private investigation firm with the help of his assistant Robin Ellacott. In this third Cormoran Strike novel, Robin receives an alarming package. There are 4 people from Strike’s past he believes could have sent it and it’s up to him and Robin to find out exactly where it came from, before it causes irreparable damage to his company.

I really enjoyed this book and once I got into it, I couldn’t put it down. I’ll be honest, it starts off a little slow. I had to persevere through the first 80 or so pages but once it got going, I was hooked. It was quite different to the first two books in the series but we get to learn a little more about Robin and Strike. I rarely like the main character in anything – books, movies, TV series’, but there’s nothing I don’t like about Cormoran Strike and Robin Ellacott and I’m an even bigger fan now that I have a greater knowledge of their backgrounds. 

I would recommend this series to anyone who enjoys fiction. It’s that simple. Crime or Private Investigator novels are not the type of book I would gravitate towards naturally, yet this series has me hooked. Everyone around me is reading them. It’s the J.K. Rowling effect.

Rating: 8/10

As part of my new year’s resolution to read more this year, I’ve decided to challenge myself a little. I love reading and get really engrossed in a good book. I plan to share reviews of the books I’m reading here. I’m teaming up with My Tiny Mind on this one so pop over there to check out reviews too. I’m not the fastest reader going so we’ve set ourselves 2 years to read 20 books. I’d love for other people to get involved. If you’re thinking of taking part, let me know in the comments and keep me posted on your progress or where you might be sharing it. You chose the books based on the list below and you can take them on in any order.

 Anyone up for a challenge?

The Big Book Challenge list

My Bedroom

Reading… Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith (a.k.a J.K. Rowling). Book number 3 for Galbraith. I’m only about 60 pages in and it’s a little slow but I’m hoping it turns out as good as the first 2.

Watching… Rookie Blue. I’m almost finished the final season and I’m getting a bit emotional. My favourite characters are Nick and Oliver.

Listening to… Adele’s latest album. It’s not living up to 21 but it’s growing on me.

Pinning…hair pics and gender equality quotes. See, you can be girly and a feminist.

Trying… soaked porridge oats with natural yogurt and fruit for breakfast. It’s making a nice change and tastes quite nice.

Drinking… less alcohol than this time last year. Trying to cut down a bit on all things bad for me. Don’t ask about the diet coke!! Please.

Considering…a trip to Amsterdam in the summer.

Scrapping… I still have catching up to do with my Project Life album from 2015 (ahem, and 2014) but I created my cover page for 2016 last week and now I’m working on my January spread. Keeping on top of it this year, I swear…kinda…hopefully!

Enjoying… spending time in my bedroom. I’ve had trouble getting to sleep lately so I’ve been going up to my room earlier than normal and trying to relax for a while before it’s time to sleep. I love the brightness of my bedroom even at this time of year. Also, it’s kind of pathetic how much new cushions make me happy. (see the middle cushion above from Penneys)

Cooking…lots of turkey dishes. Burgers, meatballs, tacos.

Planning…blog posts for the next couple of months.

Hating… The really cold, miserable weather but I’m looking forward to the light at the end of the tunnel.

Taking….the Ali Edwards’ One Little Word 2016 workshop.

Looking forward to…a great year ahead.

comfort zoneWhere the magic happens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I recently read that less than 10% of new year resolutions are kept.I’m sure that’s because people are aiming too big with very specific goals and timetables to go with them. People almost think it’s possible to be a whole new amazing person – to reach their goal weight, quit smoking, give up all junk food and so on. Another problem that I think occurs is that people jump straight in on the first of January and try to commit to all of their resolutions at once.

This year I decided to be as realistic as possible and set myself  just one “standard” resolution. By standard I mean the type mentioned above. One big goal. Last year I already made an effort to eat better and lose weight but that didn’t start until May/June. So this year I hope to lose the same amount of weight as I did in the last 6/7 months of last year. That definitely seems possible. I waited until I was back in work before I attempted to make any changes. By week two my eating habits were on their way back to my pre-December ways.

I also waited a couple of weeks until everything settled down to start thinking other about resolutions. So here goes…

This year I hope to:

  • Spend less time on social media. This is vague for a reason. I spend a lot of time on Facebook, Instagram & Pinterest and if I can cut it down at all, it’s a success. I’ve started by unfollowing accounts I’m not really interested in on Instagram & Pinterest. That means I can get through my feeds faster. The next step is to delete my Facebook app so I have to go onto my laptop to use it. I’m not quite ready for that yet.
  • Watch less reality TV. The plan is to only watch ‘I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here’ because I really enjoy it and it only lasts 3 weeks and because everyone needs a guilty pleasure. There, that’s enough reasons I’d say.
  • Get involved in Ali Edward’s ‘One Little Word’ again. I decided to do it last year for the first time and although I didn’t document it other than my first post, I stuck to it and I found it successful. Last year’s word was ‘Stronger’ and my main goal was to become stronger and less afraid to stay in the house by myself overnight. It worked. I’ve finally overcome that fear. I need to work some more on some of the other aspects of my OLW from last year. You can check my 2015 OLW here. I haven’t decided on my word for 2016 yet but when I do, I’ll be sure to write about it.
  • Read more. I plan to read more because I should have more free time considering I’m cutting down on social media and reality TV. I also want to read more books from authors that are not from Ireland, the UK and the United States.

Do any of you have resolutions you feel confident about sticking to?

I Am Malala

‘I Am Malala’  is the autobiography of a courageous young girl called Malala Yousafzai. She is a 16 year old girl from Pakistan, shot by the Taliban for speaking out about her right to be educated.There is roughly 125 million children in the world today without a school place.  This is a story of  just one girl’s struggle to simply exercise her right to an education.

This book allows you to see life from Malala’s point of view, which is vital, as it allows you to see that she is brave beyond her years while also giving you gentle reminders that she is  just a teenage girl who fights with her little brother and likes to wear pink.

The  book is broken down into 5 sections. The story starts with a background on where Malala comes from, specifically her father’s story. To be perfectly honest, the first section of the book is a bit slow and I picked it up and put it down A LOT. By a lot I mean over about a 3 month period. If this happens, persevere, it will be worth it. Once I got past section 1 I read section 2 in about a week and section 3,4 and 5 in one day. I could not put it down.

Malala’s story gave me goosebumps and left me with a sense of guilt for resenting the fact that I had  to go to school all those years. At 26, I enjoyed the book and learned a lot. I believe teenagers could gain some invaluable insight from Malala.  If they are not using this book in second level schools, it’s a crying shame.